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August 14, 2019 - Comments Off on Build skills, not contact lists: How to be an effective networker in digital era

Build skills, not contact lists: How to be an effective networker in digital era

Build Skills, not contact listsConsider the following scenario: you work as a sales manager in a fast-growing company, and over the last few years you have performed consistently well and exceeded expectations. It is the beginning of the financial year. Top management recognizes your potential and decides to give you a promotion, a raise and a role change: In line with the organization’s vision of entering new markets, you are now required to unlock growth in a new geography. This means you will shift countries and relocate to an alien land, with the intent of establishing your firm’s footprint in that country. You are excited and anxious at the same time. Excited to be given this opportunity for growth and anxious because you will start from scratch: new team, unknown market, strange culture and unfamiliar territory. It is time to unlearn and relearn.

This article is authored by Rajiv Jayaraman & Subramanian Kalpathi. To read the full article, download your copy by submitting the form.

 

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August 14, 2019 - Comments Off on The most in-demand skill: The ability to unlearn and relearn at a rapid pace

The most in-demand skill: The ability to unlearn and relearn at a rapid pace

In-demand skills

If the industrial era was anchored around working for compliance, the digital age calls for encouraging both creativity and productivity among employees. This means that where leaders would once provide direction and discourage risk-taking, they are now required to encourage autonomy and a “fail-fast” work environment.

The industrial age valued knowledge and knowhow, whereas the digital era places a premium on learning agility (an ability to unlearn and relearn at a rapid pace, thereby staying relevant and productive at work). Employees are required to work with what Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck calls a growth mindset: “People believe that their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work—brains and talent are just the starting point. This view creates a love of learning and a resilience that is essential for great accomplishment.”

This article is authored by Rajiv Jayaraman & Subramanian Kalpathi. To read the full article, download your copy by submitting the form.

 

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July 17, 2019 - Comments Off on The truth about creativity: It’s a process, not a serendipitous, magical occurrence

The truth about creativity: It’s a process, not a serendipitous, magical occurrence

The truth about creativity: It’s a process, not a serendipitous, magical occurrenceToday, the creativity narrative is about ordinary folk leveraging the community

The theme of creativity conjures up images of lone geniuses working in isolation to produce game-changing innovations. In today’s digital era characterized by user-generated innovation, crowdsourcing and co-creation, this notion of creativity is being turned on its head.

The new notion is that anybody can be creative and there are toolkits and techniques that ordinary people can use to produce extraordinary results. Researchers refer to this as everyday creativity. Everyday creativity is the ability to summon new ideas while going through mundane life experiences. It is something that lets a person see the familiar in the unfamiliar and the unfamiliar in the familiar. To understand the new model of everyday creativity, we first need to explore a few myths.

This article is authored by Rajiv Jayaraman & Subramanian Kalpathi. To read the full article, download your copy by submitting the form.

 

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July 16, 2019 - Comments Off on How to get a team of millennials, Gen Xers and baby boomers to pull together at work

How to get a team of millennials, Gen Xers and baby boomers to pull together at work

How to get a team of millennials, Gen Xers and baby boomers to pull together at workYouth can help seniors climb the digital curve and, in return, get tips on emotional intelligence

What is the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the word millennial? You might think that millennials are entitled and want to make a quick buck. Or you might believe that they are young and restless, idealistic, inherently creative and out to make a difference. How about baby boomers? Depending on your orientation, you may believe that they are carefree laggards or strict disciplinarians, or you may have a completely different notion altogether.

Our experiences at home or work may justify the biases we carry within us, which may further reinforce the stereotypes we subconsciously adhere to. This may translate into behaviours and actions that may turn out to be counterproductive to maintaining healthy relationships. Take, for instance, the father who has a tough time understanding the motivations of his millennial children and believes that they need to be disciplined.

This article is authored by Rajiv Jayaraman & Subramanian Kalpathi. To read the full article, download your copy here.

 

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June 28, 2019 - Comments Off on WORK IN THE DIGITAL AGE | Article Series Part -I

WORK IN THE DIGITAL AGE | Article Series Part -I

WORK IN THE DIGITAL AGE

Delivered like clockwork. Well-oiled machine. The next growth engine. Have you heard these expressions at the workplace? These are used as metaphors to describe effective projects, teams and innovative ideas. These metaphors, rooted in the industrial age, give you a vivid imagery of wheels spinning in stunning precision, mechanical parts moving flawlessly and cylinders firing away. Efficiency and productivity are keywords that come to mind when you think of these systems.

These metaphors are so widely and frequently used that they deeply shape our thinking and understanding of our workplace. The problem is that these metaphors don’t describe modern workplaces. Machines are great at doing the same thing, the same way repeatedly over time. The metaphor of organizations as machines works well only when the environment is controlled, predictable and structured.

It is no secret that we live in a new hyperconnected era where there is heightened uncertainty and unpredictability. In the digital age, organizations are not machines; they operate more like living and breathing organisms. Accordingly, we need a new operating logic that defines the way our projects get done, how we operate in teams and how we unlock new ideas.

As we move from the machine to the organism metaphor, we find that traditional command and control hierarchies are dissolving. Organizations have become ecosystems and traditional organizational designs have transformed into networks of competencies where individuals and teams are connected both internally and externally in intricate ways. Consequently, individuals must work with a significantly greater number of stakeholders inside and outside the organization to accomplish their goals. Traditional sources of power, centered around authority and control, don’t have the same effectiveness as they did during the industrial age. So how does an employee get things done?

In the digital age, influencing is the new currency that helps one get things done. Here are the four things one must focus on to be able to influence stakeholders in the digital age.

This article series is authored by Rajiv Jayaraman & Subramanian Kalpathi.

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June 15, 2019 - Comments Off on How to use real-time data creatively to help take effective decisions as a leader

How to use real-time data creatively to help take effective decisions as a leader

Mint series 3

Arrive at a decision by connecting the dots of data, intuition and experience

In the first week of September 2018, electric vehicle major Tesla was rocked by a series of unusual events that culminated in a not-so-happy ending for the pioneering carmaker. First, a couple of C-suite executives announced their resignations. Second, a video surfaced online showing CEO Elon Musk smoking marijuana while recording a podcast. Tesla’s stock took a massive beating and plunged over 11% within a week.

Less than two months later, however, a more positive incident went largely unnoticed. The company turned its first profit in two years, riding on the Model 3’s popularity. Tesla made $311 million, more than in any other quarter in the company’s history. In reaction to this news, Tesla’s stock soared over 9% on a single day. The genesis of this second event was Musk’s announcement in April 2018 that he would manufacture Model 3 cars round the clock to meet the company’s production target.

This article is authored by Rajiv Jayaraman & Subramanian Kalpathi.

 

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June 13, 2019 - Comments Off on Digital Checkbook – Leadership in the Digital Era

Digital Checkbook – Leadership in the Digital Era

Digital CheckbookAround seven years ago, Netscape founder and venture capitalist Marc Andreesen famously said, “Software is eating the world.” Today, we can see that his prediction has come true. The top 5 publicly traded companies by market capitalization are all software companies—Apple, Alphabet, Microsoft, Amazon and Facebook. These companies have leveraged digital technologies to disrupt numerous industries and displace many companies from their pedestals. According to Accenture CEO Pierre Nanterme, “Digital is the main reason just over half of the companies on the Fortune 500 have disappeared since the year 2000.”

One of the business realities in the digital age is that organizations have become increasingly boundary-less. Uber has more than a million drivers across the world, but not one of them is on their payroll. Airbnb delivers great accommodation experience for travellers across the world, but not one of the rooms it offers is theirs. In essence, these organizations operate in a boundary-less fashion, leveraging assets and people outside their organization to deliver value to the customer. Furthermore, there is a marked shift in the labour market towards freelancing, a trend now called the “gig economy”. According to a 2015 Intuit study, 43% of the US workforce will be freelancing by 2020. This fundamentally alters how leaders need to think about organizational boundaries.

To read more, you can download the full ebook by submitting the form here.

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June 12, 2019 - Comments Off on Why cutting-edge tech isn’t enough for virtual teams to work together seamlessly

Why cutting-edge tech isn’t enough for virtual teams to work together seamlessly

Mint series - 2It’s important to clarify the vision and goals of the company for remote workers.

Can you hear me now?”, “Who do we have on the call today?”, “Can you please put yourself on mute?”, “I am sorry it’s so late in the day for you”. These statements will sound familiar to anyone who has worked in virtual teams. Virtual teams have become the norm for many organizations that produce their products or services simultaneously in many locations, sell these products and services globally, and support the customer from a completely different location.

This was true for connecting with customers as well, which meant sales teams were on the road for long hours meeting clients face to face. While this may continue, technology advances have made it possible for employees to connect virtually with both internal and external stakeholders all over the globe.

This article is authored by Rajiv Jayaraman & Subramanian Kalpathi.

 

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June 10, 2019 - Comments Off on How the power of collective can serve as your special superpower in workplace

How the power of collective can serve as your special superpower in workplace

Mint series-1We are witnessing dramatic shifts in the workplace in the digital age. Millennials have become the largest segment of the working population. Different generations work side by side in a diverse, globalized business environment. Organizational hierarchies are flattening. Work is getting chunked into digital pieces that can be executed by someone in any part of the world. Performance management and feedback systems are becoming real time. Bell curves are going out of fashion. Automation and artificial intelligence are spreading into the domain of cognitive jobs and challenging the role of humans in the workplace. To be successful in the era of accelerated change, individuals and teams must embrace new work practices to adapt and excel. Here are five principles individuals and teams must adapt to embrace digital change.

This article is authored by Rajiv Jayaraman & Subramanian Kalpathi.

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